Love (ing the song of the day)



I really love this Mike Park song.

...and how often do we use the word "love" when we really mean "have strong feelings for" but not necessarily mean "I live and breathe for this." I think I say the word love quite frequently, but I'm concerned now that my meaning of the word is convoluted.


Websters gives me this definition:

love (lŭv)
n.

1. A deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attractive qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness.
2. A feeling of intense desire and attraction toward a person with whom one is disposed to make a pair; the emotion of sex and romance.
3.
1. Sexual passion.
2. Sexual intercourse.
3. A love affair.
4. A strong predilection or enthusiasm: a love of language.
5. The object of such an enthusiasm: The outdoors is her greatest love.
4. An intense emotional attachment, as for a pet or treasured object.
5. A person who is the object of deep or intense affection or attraction; beloved. Often used as a term of endearment.
6. An expression of one's affection: Send him my love.
7.
1. A strong predilection or enthusiasm: a love of language.
2. The object of such an enthusiasm: The outdoors is her greatest love.


The english language is a bit ridiculous when you think about it-this one word means SO many things! If I tell my best friend I love him, I could mean all of the above or just one specific one.

My cousin in high school told his then-girlfriend that he "loved her like a dog," to which we were all appalled, but I think that he was doing her a favor really. He wasn't leading her on to believe that he loved her with all his heart and would do anything for her, but rather, he loved her with great affection, like you would a pet. He explained it very logically and clearly that he did have an intense feeling for her and he did cherish her friendship and would miss her terribly if she were not around, but he could find another female to fill that void, like you would get another pet to take the place of your beloved mutt that dies. He felt that to say "I love you" to a woman, it should be from a deep, underlying feeling that you can not live without someone and you would die for them if need be. So he loved her like a dog. I actually found out about it from seeing a card he sent her for Valentines Day, which he signed:
"I love you (like a dog)."

All the times that I have said I love you to someone or about something, I am sure that it has been interpreted a certain way, but how do I know that it is interpreted the way I mean it to be? If I say I love something, do I need to clarify? Obviously, when I say I love Mike Park's music, I don't mean that I love it like a pet, I love it because I have great enthusiasm for it. But what about when I tell a boyfriend I love him? Does he understand that I mean "a feeling of intense desire" and not "A deep, tender, ineffable feeling of affection and solicitude toward a person, such as that arising from kinship, recognition of attractive qualities, or a sense of underlying oneness?" Do I need to clarify each time and let him know "I love you like a dog?" (I don't really have a strong affection for dogs though, so that wouldn't mean much!). Love is a tricky word.

Things I love:
My family
Cats (most especially mine)
A select group of friends
Broccoli (not too hard, not mushy-soft)
Massages
Reading
Vicodin (ha!)
and....
Mike Park's music

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